Main Article Content

Abstract

BACKGROUND


Digital technologies have become indispensable tools in clinical practice, revolutionizing the way healthcare professionals deliver care, access information, and manage their daily routines. However, it also presents ethical and legal challenges that need to be carefully addressed. This study focused on the assessment of knowledge and practice among dental practitioners of using digital technologies in clinical setups.


METHODS


The descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted using the well-structured, pretested, questionnaire consisting of close-ended questions and was statistically analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 3.1.9) for MS Windows.


RESULTS


Overall knowledge of participants between different years of practice (P-0.702) and between general dentists and specialties (P-0.09) had no statistically significant difference unlike in practices between the groups.


CONCLUSIONS


To navigate these issues effectively, healthcare organizations should establish comprehensive policies and procedures for their efficient use in clinical practice along with education programs for professionals.

Keywords

Clinical Practice, Digital Technology, Ethics, Knowledge and Legality.

Article Details

How to Cite
Dhamini P. M., Vaishnavi Prashanth, & Arrvinthan S. U. (2023). Digital Technologies in Clinical Practice? Ethical and Legal Knowledge and Practice - A Questionnaire-Based Cross-Sectional Study. Journal of Evolution of Medical and Dental Sciences, 12(11), 324–330. https://doi.org/10.14260/jemds.v12i11.514

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